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Four Boilerplate Responses for Responding to Subject Matter Rejections Based on the USPTO Hypotheticals

By Stephen B. Schott

This is a summary of the sample argument sections of a longer article based on the USPTO’s subject matter-based hypotheticals.

Hypothetical 1: Removing Malicious Code From Emails

When responding to a rejection at the USPTO, you might try a response along these lines.

The current claim is similar to hypothetical 1 in the USPTO’s Abstract Ideas Hypotheticals published on January 27, 2015. In that hypothetical the USPTO pointed out that the claim was patentable because an email communication was isolated in a memory sector and thus inextricably tied to computer technology. In the current claim, the [claim element] is inextricably tied to computer technology, and is thus patent-eligible subject matter.

Hypothetical 2: E-Commerce Outsourcing System/Generating a Composite Web Page 

When responding to a rejection at the USPTO, you might try a response along these lines.

The current claim is similar to hypothetical 2 in the USPTO’s Abstract Ideas Hypotheticals published on January 27, 2015. In that hypothetical the USPTO pointed out that the claim was patentable because the claim addressed a business challenge (retaining website visitors) that is particular to the Internet, which is not among the judicial exceptions to patentable subject matter. In the current claim, the [claim element] also addresses a business challenge that is particular to the internet, and is thus patent-eligible subject matter. And even if the claim were to be found to fit into one of the judicial exceptions to patentable subject matter, the additional limitations in the claim directed to [claim element] amount to more than simply stating “apply the abstract idea on the Internet.” See also DDR Holdings, LLC v. Hotels.com et al, 113 USPQ2d 1097 (Fed. Cir. 2014).

Hypothetical 3:Digital Image Processing  

When responding to a rejection at the USPTO, you might try a response along these lines.

The current claim is similar to hypothetical 3 in the USPTO’s Abstract Ideas Hypotheticals published on January 27, 2015, which is based on Research Corporation Technologies, Inc. v. Microsoft Corp, 627 F.3d 859 (Fed. Cir. 2010). In that hypothetical the USPTO pointed out that the claim was patentable because tying the mathematical operation to the processor’s ability to process digital images added significantly more to the abstract idea. In the current claim, [claim element] similarly ties the [algorithm] to the processor’s ability to [perform the claim element]. Further, in the hypothetical, the  USPTO notes that the algorithm allows the computer to use less memory than required for prior masks, which allows the computer to to use less memory. Similarly in the current claim, the [claim element] allows a computer to use less memory, which amounts to an innovation in computer technology that adds significantly more to the abstract idea. Thus, [claim ##] is patentable subject matter.

Hypothetical 4: Global Positioning System

When responding to a rejection at the USPTO, you might try a response along these lines.

The current claim is similar to hypothetical 4 in the USPTO’s Abstract Ideas Hypotheticals published on January 27, 2015, which is based on SiRF Technology Inc. v. International Trade Commission, 601 F.3d 1319 (Fed. Cir. 2010). In that hypothetical, the USPTO pointed out that the claim was patentable because the claim improves an existing technology (global positioning) by improving the signal-acquisition sensitivity of the receiver to extend the usefulness of the technology into weak-signal environments and providing the location information for display on the mobile device. Similarly, [claim element] improves [technology] and adds significantly more to the abstract idea. Thus, the subject matter is patent-eligible subject matter.

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